Where do our fears come from?

I was at the playground the other day when I saw some early teen boys swinging while holding on to a round metal disc that was suspended 8ft in the air. My first reaction was “that’s crazy!” (they were swinging almost parallel to the ground, going very fast and then just jumping off) until a few seconds later when I thought “Actually, I would have done something like that at that age!” Until about the age of 16, I was quite the tom boy.

So where do our fears come from? I always refer to S as such a daredevil. He’s fearless and such a stuntman on his little motorbike. Is fear genetic or are our fears based on our experiences and the influence of those around us? And if I didn’t encourage him to be fearless, would he be more fearful?

I did a little research and can tell you that fears aren’t genetic. Monkeys born in the wild are afraid of snakes — a useful asset for their survival. But monkeys raised in a laboratory don’t react when they see a snake, whether it’s poisonous or not. Source

It would appear that our fears mainly come from our past experiences and the influences of those around us. As a child, if we watch our mother react badly and with fear when she sees a dog, we will most likely grow up fearing dogs. You’ll often hear parents say “Don’t run, you’ll get hurt” or “Don’t do that, you’ll fall”, “don’t wear that, everyone will laugh at you”, “don’t swing too high, you’ll fall off”. All it takes is a comment, a glance, one moment, to start instilling fear in our children.

I have an irrational fear of sharks…I can’t remember at what age in started but I can pretty much freak myself out in a dark swimming pool imagining there’s a shark. I’m guessing it came from watching a scene of JAWS and other shark attack movies at a young age. Just looking at the picture below makes me shiver!!

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So how can we make sure our children don’t imbibe our fears? Quite simply I think it comes down to watching our reactions and watching our words. We can feel fear but not show it to our children. By watching our words and forming sentences in a different manner, we can let them know of the potential dangers of what they are doing without making them feel the consequence is a given. So if your child is running along the pavement you can say “Be careful running along the pavement because there are cars driving by” instead of “Stop running or you’ll get hit by a car”.

Here are some interesting related videos:

http://www.beejalparmar.com/children-pick-up-on-your-fears/

http://www.parentscanada.com/preschool/understanding-fear-based-responses-in-children

How do you choose to parent?

This evening I had the pleasure of speaking to Abby Bordner of Relationship Based Parenting. Some of you may remember the Relationship Based Parenting series I started a few months ago (more of that coming soon).

After a few minutes of chatting about this, that and the other, she asked me: What are the most important things you would like to give your son? I’ve asked myself this question many times. We all want to give our children the best but our idea of the best varies. There are many values I want to instill in S and of course I have dreams and aspirations for him but to me the most important things at present are love and stability. It’s been proven that a child’s first three years are when they have the most brain development, when their neural pathways are formed. And children who are exposed to adverse conditions such as poverty, abuse or alcoholism often go on to have failed relationships, drop out of school, grow up with physical ailments or even depression. Abby spoke to me about emotional resiliency and how it is important to teach children to manage their emotions and deal with them so that they grow into successful adults who are able to deal with struggle confidently.

One of the questions she asked on her blog recently was: How would you do things differently? You hear so many parents these days talk about how they would do things differently to the way their parents did. I believe there are two kinds of people. The first are those who say “Well I turned out okay so my parents obviously did a good enough job and I am going to raise my child in the same way” (I often hear/read this when there is a debate with regards to spanking and physical discipline). The second type of parent is one who says “Yes my parents did a great job (or they didn’t) but I am going to do a better one”. We’re in the 21st century now where access to information is at our fingertips. My mom has often told me how lucky we are these days. Parents of the last generation raised their kids the best they knew how. Parents of today have so much help and guidance online and in the form of books, classes and online information.

As S approaches 2, I find myself adopting a teacher role. He’s starting to learn right from wrong, testing boundaries and his personality is coming through. It’s really important at this age to understand your child and handle them in a way that suits their needs best. S loves to run around, drive his ride along motorbike around the house and listen to music (and dance) and so as long as it’s not raining, we spend a lot of time outdoors in the parks and playgrounds nearby and he gets music time everyday.

Personally I think it’s important to keep re-assessing the kind of parent you want to be and then making changes to work towards being that parent. Just remember, however you choose to parent is right for you.

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Relationship Based Parenting 1

A couple of weeks ago I signed up to listen to a telesummit (21 interviews) on Relationship based parenting by Abby Bordner.

Abby Bordner understands that family life can be tiring but all parents want what is best for their kids. We don’t always have the time to read books or attend parenting workshops. She set up a series of interviews with professionals in the fields of child psychology, child development and famous authors of childcare books. You can sign up for these free interviews here. The idea is to give us advice that will help us deepen our understanding of children’s behaviour, improve our relationships and find balance in our lives. All of which will make us better parents.

In case you don’t get a chance to listen to them, over the next few weeks I’ll be giving you brief outlines of some of the interviews.

The first one is with Emily Plank. She’s an early childhood professional who started her career teaching Middle School.  She wanted to make a difference to kids and realised that the younger the kids, the more impact she’d have on them. She’s now doing research and writing and working with adults (educators and mothers). It turns out she says working with adults and working with children aren’t very different. If we become better people as adults, it’d easier to then model the behaviour we’d like our children to have. Being a parent forces you to look at and improve yourself.

From the ages of 0-3 children’s neuro-pathways are developed which impact their later life. Skills developed long before children enter formal schooling help shape their future.

One of Emily’s passions is the extent to which parenting and our interactions with young children is culturally embedded. The way we raise our children is often the way we were raised and conforming to our cultural norms. In the US, independence is important. From a young age Emily would encourage her children to sit at the table and eat by themselves. Use their hands and feed themselves. In Portugal however, it is highly offensive to use your hands to eat and so children are spoon fed until they are at least 2-3 and can use a spoon and fork by themselves.

So often we feel like how we are doing things is right but when we take a step back we realise our values are not unanimous. Different cultures have different values and norms. She started a project called “The Global Voices Project” where she puts various questions out there and people from all over the world give their take on things.

There are so many things we assume are universal when in fact they’re not. It’s not that one way is right or wrong but it just gives you some humility with regards to how you raise your children because you realise there are people who raise their kids completely different to the way you do and they are smart, successful and happy.

“There’s no expert out there who knows how to manage your child. You are the expert for your child”.

Back in the day kids were not praised constantly, praised was earned. As time went on and we moved into the new century, we wanted kids to grow up with a strong self-identity and so we lavished praise and rewards on them. Now what we’re learning is that all of our praise and rewards for children is actually having the opposite effect. When we praise kids for things that they should be doing anyway, there are some negative consequences. Kids look outside of themselves constantly for self validation. They constantly need someone else to reassure them rather than knowing themselves what feels or is good. Praise puts a lot of pressure on kids so if you’re constantly praising them, children have a lot of pressure to live up to the expectations of others.  We need to give children feedback for what they are doing rather than evaluation. E.g. if your child tidies their blocks away, rather than say you’re such a good girl for tidying your blocks away, you could say, thank you for tidying your blocks away, that was very helpful.  So then they internalise the idea that they can be helpful. The more we offer feedback to kids and describe what they are doing, the better. We should praise and comment on kids effort, not their product. E.g. I noticed you were helpful at dinner, that made me happy. Children who are constantly being told they are smart don’t feel the need to make an effort when they are doing things.

We praise kids for very nobel reasons but what we don’t realise is when we praise them, research shows us they become less likely to do it in the future. So rather than say good job, comment on what they are doing. Make your child feel proud by showing you have noticed what they are doing.

If a child comes to you showing you a picture and says “what do you think of my painting?” You could say “I saw you work very hard on that painting, tell me how you did it.” Put the ball back in their court and get them reflecting on their painting.

Kids need space, time and materials to play. Emily Plank teaches parents and educators that to play, you don’t need toys or things that light up and make noise. You need materials that are multipurpose that children can use and play with which then help them move from one developmental stage to another. We always think we need to give our children cognitive skills to do well in the world when in fact we need to allow them to have unstructured, open-ended free play. Children then learn skills of self-regulation, focus, engagement and independence. And these are the skills they need to help them later in their life. We’re constantly trying to get our children ready for the next stage when actually readiness comes from just being in the moment. So when children want to play and we provide them the space and materials, they will automatically get ready for what comes next.

Spending time with your child is allowing your child to be the leader and doing what they want rather than what you want. Many people talk about children’s behaviour as being attention seeking but when we are with our children we need to think about how much attention we’re really giving them. Are we sitting on our smart phones the whole time? We need to be able to give them 100% undivided attention. Not all the time but at least while they are playing. When we really pay attention we can see what they are fearful of, what they are struggling with and then work together with them to help them. Show them that what they are doing is valuable and important and more important than your phone or to do list.

When you have materials that are multipurpose and not just toys with one purpose, it encourages creativity.

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The last question Abby asked was “What are the qualities of healthy, successful kids?”

Emily responded saying she thinks the most important qualities have nothing to do with their cognitive intelligence but children who will be successful long term are children who are capable, confident and compassionate. As parents, we have to look at children and say what you are doing right now is what you should be doing right now. Trust that your child’s inner development is exactly as it needs to be. This makes children feel capable of doing anything. Confident children are children who know who they are and know that their opinions matter. They tend to seek out meaning in life. This goes hand in hand with praise and rewards. Kids who have a strong sense of who they are can approach life with enthusiasm. Compassion; she hopes to raise kids who find out that they can have their own needs met while making sure that other people’s needs around them are met as well.